Review of Research Handbook on the Sociology of Law: Edited by Jiří Přibáň. Edward Elgar Publishing, 2020.

Authors

  • James Campbell University of Oxford/The Open University
  • Mónica Arango Olaya University of Oxford Faculty of Law

Abstract

Campbell and Arango Olaya review the Handbook on the Sociology of Law by commenting on the volume as a whole, on the process of “handbooking”, and the different approaches that can be taken to handbooking the sociology of law. After reflecting on where the handbook is situated within the field, they examine three main features: (i) its attempt to articulate the connections between the past, present, and possible futures of the sociology of law; (ii) the nature of the sociology of law as a borderland science; and (iii) the composition and coverage of the handbook by asking, through comparison, what a handbook ought to be and the role of a normative dimension in the sociology of law. Finally, the reviewers draw on the approachability of the handbook and its immense value for early-career as well as well-established academics.

Author Biographies

James Campbell, University of Oxford/The Open University

James Campbell is a DPhil Candidate at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, University of Oxford, an Editor of Frontiers of Socio-Legal Studies, and an Associate Lecturer at The Open University.

Mónica Arango Olaya, University of Oxford Faculty of Law

Mónica Arango Olaya is a DPhil in Law Candidate at Oxford University, Editor of Frontiers of Socio-Legal Studies, and Podcaster for the Oxford Human Rights Hub.

Published

2022-03-07

Issue

Section

Book Reviews